The KLU faculty, post-docs, and PhD candidates regularly publish the results of their research in scientific journals. You will find a complete overview of all KLU publications below (e.g. articles in peer-reviewed journals, professional journals, books, working papers, and conference proceedings). Search for relevant terms and keywords, or filter the list by name, year of publication or type of publication. The references include DOIs and abstracts where available, and you can download them to your own reference database or platform. We regularly update the database with new publications.

Journal Articles (Peer-Reviewed)

Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1287/inte.1080.0377

Abstract: We analyzed the text of 704 online advertisements of supply chain management jobs for MBA graduates. The content analysis of these job advertisements provided us with a list of supply chain topics, such as inventory management and supply management, and general skills, such as communication and leadership; it also showed the proportion of advertisements requesting these skills. We measured the relative coverage of the same supply chain topics in MBA-level supply chain electives and operations management core courses in 21 of the top 50 business schools in the United States by analyzing the course descriptions and the cases used in these courses. This enabled us to compare the relative importance of supply chain topics to employers on the “demand” side with the relative importance of supply chain electives in MBA curricula on the “supply” side in these schools. Our analysis indicated that the supply usually matches demand; however, there may be an undersupply of practice- or process-oriented topics, such as forecasting, procurement, supplier and vendor management, and contracts and negotiation. In addition, there may be an oversupply of conceptual and strategy-oriented topics, such as product design, supply chain design, and emerging information technology and management information.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1287/inte.1080.0342

Abstract: We analyzed the text of more than 1,000 ads for operations research (OR) jobs. Our objective was to help industry employers benchmark the skills they are seeking in OR graduates with those that other employers are seeking. Educators can also compare their offerings against the skills industry employers seek. We found that employers of OR graduates consistently require modeling, statistics, programming, and general analytical skills in an operations management context as their primary requirements regardless of sector, function within company, and even degree type. These employers also require communication, leadership, project management, spreadsheet and database, and team skills in that order.

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Copy reference link   DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jom.2007.02.005

Abstract: We explore the link between a company's performance and the extent of its offshoring of IT-enabled services, focusing on large western companies. Our performance measures comprise sales, profit as percentage of sales, profit/employee and sales/employee over 1999–2004. To measure offshoring, we consider the extent to which these companies have offshored: (1) software development and other IT-related development and maintenance, (2) business processes such as payroll or claims processing, and (3) call centers. We performed cluster analysis using the three corresponding offshoring variables to obtain broad patterns of offshoring. Then we compared the average performance of the companies in different clusters using ANOVA; did a regression analysis of the performance measures against the three offshoring variables; and performed non-parametric correlations within industry sectors. None of these tests indicated any clear link between company performance and the extent of offshoring thus suggesting that further study is needed to understand when to offshore and how best to do it.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1287/opre.1080.0519

Abstract: We believe that research, teaching, and practice are becoming increasingly disengaged from one another in the OR/MS ecosystem. This ecosystem comprises researchers, educators, and practitioners in its core along with end users, universities, and funding agencies. Continuing disengagement will result in OR/MS occupying only niche areas and disappearing as a distinct field even though its tools would live on. To understand the reasons for this disengagement better and to engender discussion among academics and practitioners on how to counter it, we present the ecosystem's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. Incorporated in this paper are insights from a cluster of sessions at the 2006 INFORMS meeting in Pittsburgh (“Where Do We Want to Go in OR/MS?”) and from the literature.

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Copy reference link   DOI: doi:10.1016/j.ejor.2006.12.065

Abstract: In this paper, we study a rich vehicle routing problem incorporating various complexities found in real-life applications. The General Vehicle Routing Problem (GVRP) is a combined load acceptance and generalised vehicle routing problem. Among the real-life requirements are time window restrictions, a heterogeneous vehicle fleet with different travel times, travel costs and capacity, multi-dimensional capacity constraints, order/vehicle compatibility constraints, orders with multiple pickup, delivery and service locations, different start and end locations for vehicles, and route restrictions for vehicles. The GVRP is highly constrained and the search space is likely to contain many solutions such that it is impossible to go from one solution to another using a single neighbourhood structure. Therefore, we propose iterative improvement approaches based on the idea of changing the neighbourhood structure during the search.

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Copy reference link   DOI: doi:10.1142/S1363919608002060

Abstract: Users have proven to be a principal driving force of many innovations in different industries. Therefore, more and more firms try to identify avenues to systematically involve users into their new product development. Despite the growing interest in user-driven or user-centred innovation, both in academia and industry, the drivers and impediments affecting the evolvement of user innovation activities over time have only recently become a focus of analysis. This study aims to examine user innovation over time and contribute to the extension of the existing model of user-driven innovation to a more dynamic setting. For this purpose, we study the evolution of user innovation in a field of sports equipment, a high-performance sailboat called Moth. We analyse innovation activities over several decades based on secondary data, interviews and survey results. We find that the level of user activity does not follow a unidirectional trend, but rather develops depending on a number of contextual factors. This suggests that, given a stimulating setting, user innovation can be sustained over long periods of time.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/j.ejor.2007.04.055

Abstract: In this study, we analyze an inventory system facing stochastic external demands and an autonomous supply (independent return flow) in the presence of fixed disposal costs and positive lead times under a continuous review replenishment–disposal policy. We derive the analytical expressions of the operating characteristics of the system; and, construct the objective function to minimize the total expected costs of ordering, holding, purchasing and disposal per unit time subject to a fill rate constraint. An extensive numerical analysis is conducted to study the sensitivity of the policy parameters and the benefit of employing a policy which allows for disposal of excess stock in this setting. We model the net demand process as the superposition of normally distributed external demand and inflows, which is expressed as a Brownian motion process. Our findings indicate that the disposal option results in considerable savings even (i) in the presence of non-zero fixed disposal costs, (ii) large actual demand rates with high return ratios (resulting in small net demands) and (iii) for moderate return ratios with high demand variability.

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Copy reference link   DOI: http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1375627.1375630   DOI: 10.3233/MGS-2007-3303

Abstract: Service compositions enable users to realize their complex needs as a single request. Despite intensive research, especially in the area of business processes, web services and grids, an open and valid question is still how to manage service compositions in order to satisfy both functional and non-functional requirements as well as adapt to dynamic changes. This article describes an approach towards adaptive management of QoS aware service compositions. This approach integrates well known concepts and techniques and proposes various execution strategies based on dynamic selection and negotiation of services included in a service composition, contracting based on service level agreements, service enactment with flexible support for exception handling, monitoring of service level objectives, and profiling of execution data. An important element of the approach is an open architecture for adaptive service composition management. Its first prototypical implementation has been developed within an EU-funded Adaptive Service Grid project.

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Copy reference link   DOI: doi:10.1108/17440080710829234

Abstract: Purpose – Service‐oriented architecture (SOA) is an architecture paradigm targeting integration of applications within and across enterprise boundaries. It has gathered research and industry acceptance and has given an enormous impetus to the business process management technology. Web service (WS) technology is one implementation of the SOA paradigm. It enables seamless integration of new and legacy applications through a stack of standardized composable specifications. WS orchestration is facilitated by the Business Process Execution Language which provides a recursive service composition model. While the programming model the WS technology provides is very flexible, a major deficiency is the need to discover services implementing a particular abstract interface, whereas functional similarities of services are disregarded. The Semantic Web Service technologies, like Web Service Modelling Ontology (WSMO) and Web Ontology Language for Services have been developed with the purpose of eliminating these deficiencies by enabling service discovery based on functional and non‐functional properties. The paper aims to focus on these issues.Design/methodology/approach – This paper presents a list of requirements that business processes impose on SOA applications. It analyzes the support that WSMO/Web Service Model eXecution environment (WSMX) provides to address these requirements and compares it with the support enabled by the WS specification stack.Findings – The paper identifies major flaws in the WSMO model and its reference implementation with respect to business process support.Originality/value – The paper recommends possible solutions for eliminating the lack of needed features on behalf of WSMO/WSMX. It presents in detail how to enable asynchronous stateful communication among WSMO WS and partner‐based WS discovery by extending the WSMO model. Additionally, it extends the API of the reference implementation to facilitate the execution of services communicating asynchronously.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1007/s11612-007-0015-6

Abstract: Due to a rising interest in empirical ‘respect’ research but at the same time a somewhat fuzzy use of the term and its semantically close neighbors, we introduce a conceptual framework. The framework draws on existing philosophical traditions and empirical psychological works alike. It is pointed out that respect, acceptance, and tolerance are all attitudes of a subject towards an object which are not aligned on one dimension, but are concerned with quite different issues. Moreover, we propose that research needs to differentiate between two very different kinds of respect. Whereas appraisal respect, acceptance, and tolerance are attitudinal reflections of a subject’s decisions on certain issues (i.e., on influence, membership, and presence), recognition respect is proposed to be an overarching processing mode, i.e., a general attitude on how to confront others.

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