The KLU faculty, post-docs, and PhD candidates regularly publish the results of their research in scientific journals. You will find a complete overview of all KLU publications below (e.g. articles in peer-reviewed journals, professional journals, books, working papers, and conference proceedings). Search for relevant terms and keywords, or filter the list by name, year of publication or type of publication. The references include DOIs and abstracts where available, and you can download them to your own reference database or platform. We regularly update the database with new publications.

Journal Articles (Peer-Reviewed)

Copy reference link   DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1042-444X(03)00018-5

Abstract: Contagion tests that are based on the correlation coefficient assume constant correlations and symmetric impacts of shocks. Moreover, they neglect volatility as a potential factor of contagion. We show that such tests can be misleading when correlations are time-varying and volatility is contagious per se. We propose a new test that is based on a regression model that eliminates the shortcomings of these tests and differentiates between mean contagion and volatility contagion in an asymmetric way. Empirical results for 11 Asian stock markets show that there is mean and volatility contagion in the Asian crisis.

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Abstract: Any company that has a global supply chain should consider introducing its strategic left hand to its operational right hand. Senior managers formulate strategy to maximize shareholder value; supply-chain planners run optimization models to minimize costs. Consider a strategic supply-chain planning exercise at a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) manufacturer that we will call Acme Vinyl Co. Acme's North American revenues came from PVC for building (55%), packaging (15%), consumer goods (10%), the electronic industry (10%), the automotive industry (4%) and from non-PVC products (6%). Although business-strategy formulation also uses tools and flame-works, it requires much more creativity than tactical planning. For tactical supply-chain planning, the decision options and the factors affecting them (production capacity, distribution capacity, variable costs, demand forecast) are clearly defined. Optimization models for tactical supply-chain planning and models for strategic supply-chain planning differ only slightly in their design, but markedly in their use. In scenario planning, senior managers build internally consistent, alternative views of possible future outcomes.

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Copy reference link   DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0922-1425(02)00016-6

Abstract: The paper analyses the causality between the Japanese prices and the yen–dollar exchange rate. It explains the long-term appreciation trend of the Japanese yen and why the Japanese yen proved strong even during the economic slump of the 1990s. The paper suggests that the appreciation of the Japanese yen forced the Japanese enterprises into price reductions and productivity increases, which put a floor under the high level of the yen and, thus, initiated rounds of appreciation. This corresponds to the conjecture of a vicious (virtuous) circle of appreciation and price adaptation. Further, there is evidence that the yen-appreciation has been accommodated by the Bank of Japan’s monetary policy. This corresponds to the conjecture that the recent Japanese deflation is imposed from outside via the exchange rate.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1287/inte.31.2.56.10633

Abstract: Focuses on use of operations research (OR) in internet-enabled supply chains of business enterprises. Benefits of using OR in planning, customer-relationship management, product design, and marketing; Impact of Internet growth on opportunities for OR; Improvement of supply-chain management of firms through OR.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1023/A:1011178931639

Abstract: This study uses the concept of shadow prices for measuring the impacts of climate change. By estimating a restricted profit function rather than a cost or a production function the explanatory power of the model is increased because of an endogenous output structure. Using low aggregated panel data on Western German farmers, the results imply that the agricultural production process is significantly influenced by climate conditions. Simulation results using a 2 CO2 climate scenario show positive impacts for all regions in Germany. Interestingly, the spatial distribution of the gainsis indicating no advantage for those regions, which currently suffer from insufficient temperature. Finally, the importance of an endogenous output structure is confirmed by the finding that the desired product mix will drastically change.

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