The KLU faculty, post-docs, and PhD candidates regularly publish the results of their research in scientific journals. You will find a complete overview of all KLU publications below (e.g. articles in peer-reviewed journals, professional journals, books, working papers, and conference proceedings). Search for relevant terms and keywords, or filter the list by name, year of publication or type of publication. The references include DOIs and abstracts where available, and you can download them to your own reference database or platform. We regularly update the database with new publications.

Journal Articles (Peer-Reviewed)

Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/S0965-8564%2898%2900066-4

Abstract: The Netherlands Railways operates a double tracked intensively used network of railroads. To expand the transportation capacity, each year a number of infrastructure expansions are considered. The evaluation of these expansions is traditionally done by establishing a set of detailed timetables that serve the forecasted transportation demand and that can be executed with the proposed infrastructure expansion. However, the development of a detailed timetable is a very time consuming process, and therefore leaves little opportunity for comparing many alternatives. In this paper, we present and test an aggregate model that can be used to single out the most promising investment alternatives in the railroad infrastructure, specifically passing constructions. The aggregate model provides the user with insight into the ranking of the various alternatives and additionally gives a relative insight into the theoretical capacity of the proposed infrastructure change.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1108/13598540010319993

Abstract: Increased demand variability in supply chains (the bullwhip effect) has been discussed in the literature. The practical measurement of this effect, however, entails some problems that have not received much attention in the literature and that have to do with the aggregation of data, incompleteness of data, the isolation of demand data for defined supply chains that are part of a greater supply web. This paper discusses these conceptual measurement problems and discusses experiences in dealing with some of these problems in an industrial project. Also presents empirical results of measurements of the bullwhip effect in two supply chains.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1111/j.1937-5956.2000.tb00326.x

Abstract: In this article, we describe the Global Project Coordination Course, a course in which project teams composed of three students from each of two overseas universities execute company-sponsored projects dealing with global supply chain management issues. The 75,000 to 100,00 contributed in total by the three to four sponsoring companies funds all course expenses. We assess the benefits and challenges of the use of cross-cultural project teams with diverse educational backgrounds. We conclude that the course provides a unique and effective vehicle for furthering students’ knowledge of Supply Chain Management and Information Systems, improving understanding of "soft" issues, and training students to work in diverse, global, cross-cultural project teams.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1023/A%3A1008999002145

Abstract: We investigate the performance of workload rules used to support customer order acceptance decisions in the hierarchical production control structure of a batch chemical plant. Customer order acceptance decisions need to be made at a point in time when no detailed information is available about the actual shop floor status during execution of the order. These decisions need therefore be based on aggregate models of the shop floor, which predict the feasibility of completing the customer order in time. In practice, workload rules are commonly used to estimate the availability of sufficient capacity to complete a set of orders in a given planning period. Actual observations in a batch chemical manufacturing plant show that the set of orders accepted needs to be reconsidered later, because the schedule turns out to be infeasible. Analysis of the planning processes used at the plant shows that workload rules can yields reliable results, however at the expense of a rather low capacity utilization. In practice this is often unacceptable. Since, solving a detailed scheduling problem is not feasible at this stage, this creates a dilemma that only can be solved if we can find more detailed aggregate models than workload rules can provide.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1023/A%3A1007672800764

Abstract: Aggregate models of detailed scheduling problems are needed to support aggregate decision making such as customer order acceptance. In this paper, we explore the performance of various aggregate models in a decentralized control setting in batch chemical manufacturing (no-wait job shops). Using simulation experiments based on data extracted from an industry application, we conclude that a linear regression based model outperforms a workload based model with regard to capacity utilization and the need for replanning at the decentralized level, specifically in situations with increased capacity utilization and/or a high variety in the job mix.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1007/BF03371618

Abstract: The German market for Digital Television has not reached the targeted numbers of adopters yet. Although the diffusion of DFI or Premiere Digital is marginal so far, significant discussions in the community about the danger of monopolistic structures have taken place, with main focus on the KirchGroup as one of the pioneers and main content-provider. In contrast, we show that this discussion is rather short-term oriented. The existing Digital Television is merely an important technological step towards Interactive Television, which provides a much broader variety of services, and will consist of a different set of players. As such the arguments against the KirchGroup are not relevant in the long run. Our main hypothesis bases on the need to provide more contents as Digital Television turns interactive. Therefore more content-providers will gain access to the system or otherwise the internet will become the dominant alternative for the users.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1080/13675569908901576

Abstract: The level of traffic congestion on the UK road network is steadily increasing and impairing the efficiency of logistical activities. Previous studies have focused on the direct costs of congestion to road users. This paper presents the results of a study of the indirect effects of traffic congestion on the internal operations of seven distribution centres in the fast-moving-consumer-goods sector. In-depth interviews were held with several managers in each of these distribution centres to assess the relative importance of congestion-related delays and to examine how firms have adapted their logistical operations to the congestion problem. The research suggests that it will be very difficult to quantify at a macro level the indirect costs of traffic congestion to industry.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1023/A:1008130918565

Abstract: Based on an unbalanced panel of all Bavarian cooperative banks for the years of 1989--97, which includes information on 283 mergers, we analyze motives and cost effects of small-scale mergers in German banking. Estimating a frontier cost function with a time-variable stochastic efficiency term, we show that positive scale and scope effects from a merger arise only if the merged unit closes part of the former branch network. When we compare actual mergers to a simulation of hypothetical mergers, size effects of observed mergers turn out to be slightly more favorable than for all possible mergers. Banks taken over by others are less efficient than the average bank in the same size class, but exhibit, on average, the same efficiency as the acquiring firms. For the post-merger phase, our empirical results provide no evidence for efficiency gains from merging, but point instead to a leveling off of differences among the merging units.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1023/A:1018346332447

Abstract: Using 1992 data of 1490 banks covering about 40% of German banking, we specify amulti-product translog cost function and follow the “thick frontier”-approach to control for cost inefficiency when evaluating the technology of banking. Scale economies are found to exist up to a size of about 5 billion DM of total assets, with diseconomies being caused by non-operating costs. There is hardly any evidence of economies of scope. Compared to cost inefficiency external factors play a surprisingly strong role in explaining cost differences between high-cost and low-cost banks. Smaller banks turn out to be more responsive to input prices.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/S0167-8116(97)00038-4

Abstract: Marketing controllers traditionally analyze the profit contribution variance between actual and plan by decomposing it into a quantity and a price variance. This, however, enables them only to identify areas where problems exist rather than to diagnose their causes. In order to get more insights, this paper proposes making the planning assumptions for achieving a certain profit contribution explicit beforehand by specifying appropriate response functions. This information can be used after the fact to calculate the amount of profit contribution variance associated with different sources. In particular, the paper offers a novel decomposition principle of total variance into partial variances associated with possible sources such as incorrect market response assumptions (planning variance), deviations of actual marketing actions from planned ones (execution variance) and misanticipation of competitive reactions (reaction variance). Each of these variances can be decomposed further into the separate effects of single marketing instruments. By distinguishing between a response function for market share and one for market size, controllers can also estimate for which part of the variance the product manager may be responsible.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1163/156857098300152082

Abstract: Over the past decade, the deregulation of the road haulage operations at both national and international levels has gathered momentum, particularly within the European Union. This paper assesses the effects of this removal of quantitative controls and examines the justification for the remaining constraints on own-account operations and for the 'financial standing' requirement that new operators must meet. It also examines the case for re-imposing quantitative licensing in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of road freight transport.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1007/BF03371503

Abstract: The problem of optimally allocating a scarce resource with impact on sales across products or market segments has been addressed in the marketing literature by statistically estimating the response functions and applying a nonlinear optimization algorithm. In contrast, managers typically use simple but nonoptimal allocation rules such as budgets proportional to past or planned sales. Here, a new and easy to implement rule is derived from the property that in the optimum the product of profit contribution and the respective elasticity should be equal across products and segments. The goodness of traditional rules as well as the new one is investigated with the help of a computer simulation experiment. The results show that the new rule is superior, provides very good solutions already in the first application, near-optimal solutions after a few consecutive applications and converges to the optimum.

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Abstract: Ten years ago Albers/Peters (1997) analyzed the impact of eCommerce on the retail value chain. Since then major change has taken place. Apart from the expected unbundling of several retail activities along the value chain, especially the consumer buying process has been taken online and increasingly supported by new infomediaries. Those new infomediaries have taken the retailer's traditional ground. New technologies, applications and a changing consumer behavior will confront today's market players, infomediaries as well as offline-, online- and multichannelretailers, with even bigger challenges.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.2307/20714861

Abstract: This article applies a modern empirical test of conduct to assess competitive conditions in the German banking sector. The elasticity of total revenues with respect to changes in input prices is calculated, using the intermediation approach as model of the banking firm. The functional form of the revenue equation is specified as a Translog function. The empirical basis consists of a panel of 1432 German universal banks with an observation period of at least four years for each of them. To account for potential consequences of the distinct regulatory environment and average bank size, the estimations are run separately for the three subgroups „cooperative banks”, „savings banks” and „credit banks”. The empirical results are consistent with the behavior of monopolistic competition, rejecting significantly the hypotheses of both monopoly and perfect competition. Differences between the subgroups turned out to be small, rejecting a causality from market share on market behavior.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1108/09684909710155547

Abstract: Describes the decision‐support system CAPPLAN. CAPPLAN has been developed for firms which sell their products through a salesforce to industrial customers or wholesalers and retailers. Explains that in such situations, it is common practice to negotiate the price based on guidelines provided by the sales management. Details how CAPPLAN offers a jointly optimal differentiation of prices and allocation of calling effort across account groups subject to both a limited production capacity and working‐time capacity, and also provides a parametric optimization of prices and calling effort for varying levels of production capacity. Reports how the system has been applied at an industrial photo laboratory selling the development of film and the production of prints through retailers, resulting in a substantial improvement in profits.

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