The KLU faculty, post-docs, and PhD candidates regularly publish the results of their research in scientific journals. You will find a complete overview of all KLU publications below (e.g. articles in peer-reviewed journals, professional journals, books, working papers, and conference proceedings). Search for relevant terms and keywords, or filter the list by name, year of publication or type of publication. The references include DOIs and abstracts where available, and you can download them to your own reference database or platform. We regularly update the database with new publications.

Book Chapters

Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-21266-1_22

Abstract: This work was created as part of the research project SEAK, which looks into possible causes and consequences of food shortfalls in Germany and is moreover also aimed at developing and evaluating possible mitigation strategies for these shortfalls. For the management of shortfalls in food supply it would be, as a first step, crucial to have information on existing inventories. Making for example decisions on the reallocation of food products into regions affected by disasters is only possible if knowledge about the (regional) availability of food quantities is present in the first place. This could be considered as a necessary transparency. However, in the German food sector, it is hard to get data about the inventories kept by companies like producers, logistic service providers (LSP’s), wholesalers or retailers. This is due to the fact that usually companies are not obliged to publish this information. Moreover, this information is also considered confidential in most companies, since it would give competitors insight into their business model and processes, which are oftentimes the basis for their success. Since information concerning food inventories is not publicly available, it has to be derived in another manner. This work is aimed at providing a scientific basis for the modelling of inventories along food supply chains. More specifically, it does so for the food commodity group of dairy products. We gathered information on all available food products, but limit this particular analysis to dairy products as a showcase of our approach. First, we introduce the data set used for the analysis and the methodology applied to it. In a next step, characteristics of typical German dairy supply chains are described using practical evidence as well as literature findings. The description follows the supply chain’s structure from start to finish, downstream. In the end, concluding remarks are made and possible further research ventures are suggested.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-11891-8_17

Abstract: The increase in traded container volumes worldwide puts pressure on the hinterland road network, leading congestion and emission problems. This leads to a requirement to develop intermodal transportation systems. In this chapter, we analyze the most important features of such container transportation systems for the hinterland supply chain. At the network design level, we review the current state of the art and we identify avenues for future research. Among others, we highlight that the coordination of container shipments across the container supply chain is a particularly relevant issue as hinterland networks involve several actors. At the operational level, we characterize the most important factors influencing the trade-off between intermodal transportation and truck-only deliveries. In addition, we provide a case study of coordination at an intermodal barge terminal in the Netherlands. We highlight that the exchange of information is the key enabler for efficient hinterland intermodal transportation and we show that a better information system can be of crucial importance.

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Abstract: Chapter VII - The experience in Northern Europe1. Ports and logistics integration2. The role of the port authorities3. The success of Northern European ports4. The distinctive traits of rail transport in the ports of Northern Europe5. The main experiences in Europe6. Conclusions

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199794911.013.002

Abstract: Despite self-determination and person-environment fit theories being comprised of several common key components, rarely have these theoretical frameworks been integrated. Both self-determination and person-environment fit theories highlight the importance of individuals’ need satisfactions and motivations. For example, self-determination theory highlights the importance of the reasons for goal pursuit in predicting individual well-being. Similarly, in person-environment fit theories, employee-environment value congruence is important because values influence outcomes through goals (motivation). The article begins by discussing the similarities and differences between these two theoretical frameworks, then devotes attention to integrating these frameworks and presenting an agenda for future research. It also discusses social network theory and research and highlights the potential usefulness of integrating these lines of research. A main premise of the article’s analysis is that self-determination theory is likely a useful framework for better understanding the processes through which person-environment fit influences employee outcomes.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-444-63456-6.50074-0

Abstract: Decisions in an oil refinery are made at three levels: planning, scheduling and control. Existing facilities have to be operated close to their maximum capacity, while continuously responding to cost fluctuations. In many of the currently reported planning models each decision level has its own model and is used separately. Integration of these models will lead to solutions closer to the optimum than modeling the decision levels separately. However, simply combining the levels into one model would lead to very large models that yet cannot be solved within reasonable time. To overcome the computational time issue a rolling horizon approach is proposed in this work.

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Copy reference link   DOI: doi:10.1007/978-3-642-37601-6_3

Abstract: Wirtschaftsverkehrs- und City-Logistik-Modelle ermöglichen die Simulation des Verkehrsverhaltens sowie die Untersuchung und Bewertung von verschiedenen verkehrspolitischen Maßnahmen. Prominente Maßnahmen sind beispielsweise Einfahrverbote bestimmter Lkw-Typen, räumlich und zeitlich differenzierte Mautgebühren oder die Nutzung von Güterverkehrszentren. Diese Arbeit ist eingebettet in einen übergeordneten Ansatz zur mikroskopischen Modellierung des städtischen Distributionsverkehrs im Lebensmitteleinzelhandel. Neben der Verhaltensmodellierung der Entscheidungsträger sowie der physischen Simulation der Fahrzeugbewegungen liegt die große Herausforderung in der Gewinnung der Modelleingangsdaten zur Beschreibung des umfassenden Entscheidungsproblems in der Distributionslogistik. Die Ableitung dieser Daten sowie die Illustration am Beispiel eines Berlin-Szenarios ist Gegenstand des vorliegenden Aufsatzes.

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Abstract: Sustainability becomes increasingly important for all business areas. When it comes to the development of sustainable products it is necessary to have a clear under- standing of what makes a product sustainable. Such a definition has not emerged yet; this calls for taking a different angle when approaching the problem. This paper presents the results of an experimental study within the field of sustainable product development to investigate the influence of different stakeholders on development decisions.

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Copy reference link   DOI: doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-410400-6.00004-5

Abstract: Distribution structures are important elements of the freight transportation system. Goods are routed via warehouses on their way from production to consumption. This chapter discusses drivers behind these structures, logistics decisions connected to distribution structures on the micro level, and possible modeling methodologies on the macro level. The authors show the connection between the micro and the macro level and highlight advantages of the different modeling approaches.

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