The KLU faculty, post-docs, and PhD candidates regularly publish the results of their research in scientific journals. You will find a complete overview of all KLU publications below (e.g. articles in peer-reviewed journals, professional journals, books, working papers, and conference proceedings). Search for relevant terms and keywords, or filter the list by name, year of publication or type of publication. The references include DOIs and abstracts where available, and you can download them to your own reference database or platform. We regularly update the database with new publications.

Journal Articles (Peer-Reviewed)

Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1111/eufm.12001

Abstract: This experimental study investigates the impact of affective attitudes on risk and return estimates of stocks. Participants rate well-known blue-chip firms on an affective scale and forecast risk and return of the firms’ stock. We find that positive affective attitudes lead to a prediction of high return and low risk, while negative attitudes lead to a prediction of low return and high risk. This bias increases with participants’ confidence in their ratings and decreases with financial literacy. Firm characteristics such as a firm’s marketing expenditures and the strength of its brand have a positive impact on its affective rating.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1007/s11573-013-0675-3

Abstract: Recent cases of unethical publication behavior have raised the question of how to address it. Because scientific misconduct (conduct inconsistent with accepted scientific standards) can occur on a continuum ranging from honest errors to outright fraud, there is a need to change editorial policies to reduce the existence of any gray areas. In the case of quantitative empirical research, misconduct begins with honorary and ghost authors, plagiarism and self-plagiarism, and extends to manipulation or even fabrication of data and the reporting of biased or false results. It is suggested that journals should retract articles, inform retraction watch more frequently, use plagiarism software, ask for better and more detailed documentation of procedures so that research can be replicated and potentially analysed as manipulation, and reveal possible affiliations that might lead to biases. These policies will also facilitate faster learning, which will be beneficial to society.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpe.2014.05.019

Abstract: Advanced inventory policies require timely system-wide information on inventories and customer demand to accurately control the entire supply chain. However, the presence of unsynchronized processes, processing lags or inadequate communication structures hinder the widespread availability of real-time information. Therefore, inventory systems often have to deal with obsolete data which can seriously harm the overall supply chain performance. In this paper, we apply transfer function methods to analyze the effect of information delays on the performance of supply chains. We expose the common echelon-stock policy to information delays and determine to what extent a delay in inventory information and point-of-sale data deteriorates the inventory policies׳ performance. We compare the performance of this policy with the performance of an installation-stock policy that is independent of information delays since it only requires local information. We find that this simple policy should be preferred in certain settings compared to relying on a complex policy with outdated system-wide information. We derive an echelon-stock policy that compensates for information delays and show that its performance improves significantly in their presence. We note potential applications of the approach in service parts supply chains, the hardwood supply chain, and in fast moving consumer goods settings.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1287/trsc.2013.0481

Abstract: The transport sector is the second largest carbon emissions contributor in Europe and its emissions continue to increase. Many producers are committing themselves to reducing transport emissions voluntarily, possibly in anticipation of increasing transport prices. In this paper we study a producer that has outsourced transport and has decided to cap its carbon emissions from outbound logistics for a group of customers. Setting an emission constraint for a group of customers allows for taking advantage of the portfolio effect. We focus on reducing emissions by switching transport modes within an existing network, since this has a large impact on emissions. In addition, the company sets the sales prices, which influence demand. The problem is solved by decomposing the multi-product problem into several single-product problems, which we then analyze separately. Using the single-product solutions we create an efficient frontier which reflects the trade-off between total carbon emissions and the total prot. It is observed that a diminishing rate of return applies in reducing emissions by switching transport modes. In a case study we apply our method to a producer of bulk liquids and find that emissions can be reduced by 10% at only a 0.7% increase in total logistics cost.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1002/mar.20686

Abstract: Values are an important concept in marketing because they comprise part of peoples’ identity and can thus help marketers separate and target different audiences. Unsurprisingly, places and their marketing initiatives increasingly try to appeal to (potential) residents’ identity by communicating core values. While the notion of value congruence is not novel, most empirical methods in marketing to date only account for the degree rather than the level of congruence. To address this issue, the present article utilizes polynomial regression and response surface methodology (Edwards & Parry, 1993) in the context of place marketing. Accordingly, the first study shows that the perceived congruence of residents’ own values and the values of stereotypical city inhabitants significantly affect residents’ feelings about their own cities (N = 1257), but with different effects for different values and levels of congruence. This finding holds not only for popular target groups such as the “creative class” but also across all groups. The second study (N = 449) shows that city slogans can effectively communicate specific values and that value congruence leads to a more positive evaluation of the city brand. Finally, the article discusses the benefits of differentiating between levels of congruence both in marketing research in general, and place brand management in particular.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1080/03088839.2014.932926

Abstract: Environmental sustainability in the port industry is of growing concern for port authorities, policy makers, port users and local communities. Innovation can provide a solution to the main environmental issues, but often meets resistance. While certain types of technological or organisational innovation can be satisfactorily analysed using closed system theories, in the case of seaports and in particular in the area of environmental sustainability, more advanced conceptual frameworks have to be considered. These frameworks need to be able to account for the multiple stakeholder nature of the port industry and of the network and vertical interactions that environmental sustainability calls for. This article investigates successful innovations improving environmental sustainability of seaports. The proposed framework builds in part on research concepts developed in the InnoSuTra EU FP7 project. From a methodological perspective, this article develops a method for quantifying the degree of success of innovation with respect to a set of specific objectives. Several case studies are used to test the framework against real innovation examples, such as onshore power supply, or alternative fuels. In this article, we argue that only those innovations that fit dynamically port actors’ demands and the port institutional environment stand a chance to succeed.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1007/s10551-013-1733-z

Abstract: This paper argues that the MBA, probably the most successful academic program of the last 50 years, negatively affects the theory and practice of management with regard to ethics through its pedagogy, structure, and its underlying epistemic assumptions. In particular I seek to demonstrate how the syllabus, the pedagogy and the epistemological assumptions of MBA programs together make managers/leaders unable and unwilling to deal with ethics. I also argue that while the what (content) and the how (pedagogy) play a very important role, it was only the emergence of a radical philosophical underpinning (the why) that has put management education on a negative trajectory. The paper thus examines MBA education from a meta-level perspective, connecting the pedagogical model with epistemological beliefs.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1504/IJSTL.2014.059570

Abstract: In the last few years, sulphur emissions to air from shipping have been of heightened interest to policymakers and the media, and more stringent regulation is on the way. Various alternatives are available in the shipping industry to comply with emission regulation and minimise impacts on shipowners' bottom-line. New regulation is adding complexity to managerial decision-making, so that advanced decision support tools can provide useful contributions to management processes. The present paper presents an analysis of the options available to shipowners taking into consideration the value of deferring the investment decision vis-à-vis the advantages obtainable from the exploitation of fuel price differentials. The model shows that there is a trade-off between low LNG prices and LNG capital expenses. While in most cases it would not be recommended to invest in LNG as early as today, the model shows that investment in LNG can make economic sense as early as 2015. This is highly dependent on the capital costs necessary for retrofitting ships with LNG engines and the difference between LNG prices and distillates prices.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpe.2013.11.016

Abstract: This paper presents ways for senior researchers to help future doctoral students in Operations Management (OM) to overcome multiple challenges in the following: (a) conducting relevant research while demonstrating greater rigor, and (b) exploring multi-disciplinary research projects while mastering a single research method. Recognizing that knowledge is generally created in four broad stages ((I) awareness, (II) framing, (III) modeling and (IV) validation), we first argue that different research approaches (analytical, behavioral, case study, or empirical) serve different roles in each of these stages: (1) case study approach for awareness, (2) empirical methods for framing, (3) analytical modeling for modeling and analysis, and (4) behavioral for validation in the real world. Then we discuss ways to enable doctoral students to overcome the aforementioned challenges.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1111/ijmr.12017

Abstract: Motives and values at work have long been key topics of business and management studies. In a focused review of the literature on the nature of human values, this paper identifies a disconnect with the literature on human motivation, despite the otherwise inherent relatedness of the two fields. Specifically, extant theory and research have conceptualized values generally in terms of ideals, namely desired end-states that individuals strive to approach. Although values, by this definition, express motivational concerns, theories of human motivation suggest that there are two forces to consider, i.e. approach and avoidance motivation. By applying this ‘two forces’ perspective to value research, this paper identifies a gap in the literature on values: namely, the idea that individuals are also influenced by counter-ideal values, i.e. end-states that they deliberately seek to avoid. The identification of this gap opens up new opportunities for value research in general and organizational value research in particular. To pave the way for future research, this paper critically discusses the few studies that have taken first steps in that direction and outlines research questions that may follow for issues such as employer branding and person–organization fit. This paper closes by providing suggestions on how to tackle the issue in organizational practice.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2013.11.002

Abstract: This paper analyzes the relationship between freight accessibility and logistics employment in the US. It develops an accessibility measure relevant for logistics companies based on a gravity model. This allows for an analysis of the accessibility of US counties focusing on four different modes of transportation: road, rail, air, and maritime. Using a Partial Least Squares model, these four different freight accessibility measures are combined into two constructs, continental and intercontinental freight accessibility, and related to logistics employment. Results show that highly accessible counties attract more logistics employment than other counties. The analyses show that it is very important to control for the effect of the county population on both freight accessibility and logistics employment. While county population explains the most variation in the logistics employment per county, there is a significant relationship between freight accessibility and logistics employment, when controlling for this effect. Keywords: Accessibility, Freight transport, Logistics employment

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/j.jedc.2014.01.001

Abstract: AbstractThe increase in the price of gold between 2002 and 2011 appears to be a candidate for a potential asset price ‘bubble’, suggesting that chartists (feedback traders) were highly active in the gold market during this period. Hence, this paper develops and tests empirically several models incorporating heterogeneous expectations of agents, specifically fundamentalists and chartists, for the gold market. The empirical results show that both agent types are important in explaining historical gold prices but that the 10-year bull run of gold in the early 2000s is consistent with the presence of agents extrapolating long-term trends. Technically this paper is a further step toward providing an empirical foundation for certain assumptions used in the heterogeneous agents literature. For example, the empirical results presented in this paper compare the economical and statistical significance of numerous switching variable specifications that are generally only introduced ad hoc.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.5465/AMBPP.2014.15572abstract

Abstract: This paper argues that economics as a scientific discipline has gone through three phases – each further removing it from what it clearly should be and what is was intended to be by its founder: a social science. From Adam Smith's view of economics as social science, via 19th century economics where the natural sciences were adopted as a role model (economics as social physics) to the current understanding, which seems to define economics as a formal science (economics as mathematics). Economics, and with it management, has been systematically de-socialised and de-ethicised over the past 200 years and during that time, the rational actor approach has gained unassailable paradigmatic status, despite its obvious shortcomings. Questions about the role of ethics are rarely asked as ethics plays no role in what has bee turned into a formal science. Partial critiques and especially critiques of more recent trends in business theory will not be able to shake a 200 year-old ideology. If one wants to change the way management is taught in business schools with regards to ethics and epistemology one will have to systematically address the very foundations of business theory created two hundred years ago.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1007/s10696-012-9170-3

Abstract: A variety of activity-based methods exist for estimating the carbon footprint in transportation. For instance, the greenhouse gas protocol suggests a more aggregate estimation method than the Network for Transport and Environment (NTM) method. In this study, we implement a detailed estimation method based on NTM and different aggregate approaches for transportation carbon emissions in the dynamic lot sizing model. Analytical results show the limitations of aggregate models for both accurate estimation of real emissions and risks of compliance with carbon constraints (e.g., carbon caps). Extensive numerical experimentation shows that the magnitude of errors can be substantial. We provide insights under which limited conditions aggregate estimations can be used safely and when more detailed estimates are appropriate.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1111/jpim.12102

Abstract: Open innovation research and practice recognize the important role of external complementors in value creation. At the same time, firms need to retain exclusive control over some essential components to capture value from their product and/or service system. This paper contributes to the literature by analyzing some of the trade-offs between openness to external value creation and closedness for internal value capture. It focuses on selective openness as a key variable and investigates how it affects value creation by external complementors, specifically the members of user innovation communities. Openness, it is hypothesized, matters to community members: The more open a product design is, the higher their sense of involvement in the innovation project, and the larger the effort they devote to it. Unlike prior literature, different forms and loci of openness are distinguished, specifically the transparency, accessibility, and replicability of different components of the product being developed.Hypotheses are tested based on survey data (n = 309) from 20 online communities in the consumer electronics and information technology hardware industries. Multilevel regression analysis is used to account for clustering, and thus nonindependent data, at the community level. We find that openness indeed increases community members’ involvement in the innovation project and their contributions to it. Interestingly, however, some forms and loci of openness strongly affect community perceptions and behavior, while others have limited or no impact. This finding suggests that, at least in relation to user communities, the trade-off that firms face between external value creation and internal value capture is softer than hitherto understood. Contingency factors that may be able to explain these patterns are advanced. For example, users are expected to value the form of openness that they have the capabilities and incentives to exploit.The findings in this paper extend the literature on selective openness in innovation. They emphasize the need to study the demand for different forms of openness at the subsystem level and align supply-side strategies to it. In managerial practice, a careful assessment of the demand for openness enables firms to successfully use selective openness and to effectively appropriate value from selectively open systems.

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Abstract: Most managers know that they should protect their supply chains from serious and costly disruptions — but comparatively few take action. The dilemma: Solutions to reduce risk mean little unless they are evaluated against their impact on cost efficiency.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/j.obhdp.2014.04.003

Abstract: This longitudinal study used data from 91 self-managed teams (456 individuals, 60 nationalities) to examine the interactive effects of a team’s task (“workflow”) network structure and its cultural diversity (as indexed by nationality) on the team’s “potency” (i.e., the team’s confidence in its ability to perform) and its performance (as rated by expert judges). We found that whereas the emergence of dense task networks enhanced team potency it was the emergence of (moderately) centralized task networks that facilitated team performance. These varied structural effects, moreover, were themselves contingent on team composition: the more culturally diverse a team, the more pronounced were the positive effects of network density on team potency and the higher the level of network centralization required for optimal team performance. The success of a team appears to hinge on the interplay between network structure and team composition.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.20470/jsi.v5i1.189

Abstract: Simulations are long-running computations driven by non-trivial data dependencies. Workflow technology helps to automate these simulations and enable using Quality of Data (QoD) frameworks to determine the goodness of simulation data. However, existing frameworks are specific to scientific domains, individual applications, or proprietary workflow engine extensions. In this paper, we propose a generic approach to use QoD as a uniform means to steer complex interdisciplinary simulations implemented as workflows. The approach enables scientists to specify abstract QoD requirements that are considered to steer the workflow for ensuring a precise final result. To realize these Quality of Data-driven workflows, we present a middleware architecture and a WS-Policy-based language to describe QoD requirements and capabilities. To prove technical feasibility, we present a prototype for controlling and steering simulation workflows and a real world simulation scenario.

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Copy reference link   DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbankfin.2012.10.015

Abstract: The copula function defines the degree of dependence and the structure of dependence. This paper proposes an alternative framework to decompose the dependence using quantile regression. We demonstrate that the methodology provides a detailed picture of dependence including asymmetric and non-linear relationships. In addition, changes in the degree or structure of dependence can be modeled and tested for each quantile of the distribution. The empirical part applies the framework to three different sets of financial time-series and demonstrates substantial differences in dependence patterns among asset classes and through time. The analysis of 54 global equity markets shows that detailed information about the structure of dependence is crucial to adequately assess the benefits of diversification in normal times and crisis times.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1007/s10551-013-1956-z

Abstract: This article seeks to model the agenda-setting strategies of stakeholders equipped with online and other media in three cases involving protests against multinational corporations (MNCs). Our theoretical objective is to widen agenda-setting theory to a dynamic and nonlinear networked stakeholder context, in which stakeholder-controlled media assume part of the role previously ascribed to mainstream media (MSM). We suggest system dynamics (SD) methodology as a tool to analyse complex stakeholder interactions and the effects of their agendas on other stakeholders. We find that largely similar dynamics of interactions occur among stakeholders in these cases, and that the costs for managements of maintaining their agendas steadily rises. We conclude that the “web of watchdogs” comprises a powerful reason for managers to engage in responsibility negotiations with their stakeholders.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2012.10.001

Abstract: This paper analyzes location dynamics of logistics establishments in relation to spatial clustering. Such an analysis is relevant for both decision makers within logistics firms and regional policy makers, as co-located logistics establishments as well as society as a whole can benefit from co-location of logistics establishments. For this analysis, longitudinal empirical data on logistics establishments in a Dutch province are used. Six general conclusions are drawn on spatial concentration and location decisions of logistic firms. First, logistics employment spatially concentrates in particular areas, called Absolute and Relative Concentration areas (AREC areas). Second, larger logistics establishments locate relatively often in AREC areas. Third, logistics establishments that relocate within the province locate relatively more in AREC areas than in other areas, while new logistics establishments do not. Fourth, logistics establishments from AREC areas are more likely to relocate in AREC areas than establishments from non-AREC areas. Hence, experience matters in location decisions of logistics firms. Fifth, transport establishments locate relatively often in emerging AREC areas. Finally, data on employment growth show that intermodal container terminals attract logistics employment, in their direct vicinity as well as on a municipal level.

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Abstract: While relationship learning has been addressed in marketing theory, it has not yet been explored as a possible dimension of the second-order construct of relationship quality (RQ). This construct has so far been mostly conceptualized to consist of trust and commitment, sometimes also satisfaction; however, some see the latter more as a consequence of the former two. Additionally, while RQ and its multidimensionality have been researched in the marketing literature, this area has remained virtually unexplored in the supply and operations management literature. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the multidimensional nature of the second-order construct of RQ in a particular setting of transnational corporation (TNC) buyer-supplier relationships. Our paper aims to determine if relationship learning can be considered an important dimension of RQ, alongside trust and commitment. In our study of relationship learning, we follow Jean, Sinkovics and Kim (2010) and Jean and Sinkovics (2010), who have focused on the governance aspect of relationship learning in managing supply performance outcomes. We employ an indirect testing approach by testing RQ as a second-order reflective construct comprised of trust, commitment and relationship within a simple variance-based Structural Equation Modeling (SEM). Our results confi rm that relationship learning is an important dimension of the second-order construct of RQ. This was done on a tentative sample of 11 TNC purchasing managers and 55 evaluated suppliers, albeit with some research limitations which we acknowledge. Our research calls for additional cross-validation of our tentative results.

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Copy reference link   DOI: doi:10.1016/j.ejor.2013.05.021

Abstract: We investigate a combined routing and scheduling problem for the maintenance of electricity networks. In electricity networks power lines must be regularly maintained to ensure a high quality of service. For safety reasons a power line must be physically disconnected from the network before maintenance work can be performed. After completing maintenance work the power line must be reconnected. Each maintenance job therefore consists of multiple tasks which must be performed at different locations in the network. The goal is to assign each task to a worker and to determine a schedule such that the downtimes of power lines and the travel effort of workers are minimized. For solving this problem, we combine a Large Neighborhood Search meta-heuristic with mathematical programming techniques. The method is evaluated on a large set of test instances which are derived from network data of a German electricity provider.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpe.2011.11.025

Abstract: Demand for spare parts is often difficult to forecast using historical data only. In this paper, we give an overview of installed based management and provide several ways in which installed base information can be used to support forecasting. We discuss cases where installed base information is used in forecasting at four companies and list the issues involved. Moreover, we review some models to illustrate the potential value of the installed base information and conclude that forecasts of spare parts demand and return can be made considerably more timely and accurate using installed base information.

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Copy reference link   DOI: 10.1142/S021987701340021X

Abstract: Adoption processes are often heavily influenced by interpersonal communication. Marketing managers are increasingly trying to use these relationships to foster the market penetration of their products. In an empirical study of the US market for an innovative medical device, we survey the social network of (mostly chief) anesthetists from 151 hospitals. We confirm the influences from personal communication on individual adoption decisions through hazard regressions. We then use a multi-agent modeling framework trying to identify what seeding strategies would have been optimal to achieve a fast market penetration, i.e. which and how many anesthetists should be selected to initiate personal communication processes.

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