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Humanitarian Logistics Database

Database of books and publications


Books

  • Tomasini Rolando, Van Wassenhove Luk. 2009. “Humanitarian Logistics”, INSEAD Business Press.
  • Kovacs Gyongyi, Spens Karen M. 2012. “Relief Supply Chain Management for Disasters: Humanitarian aid and emergency logistics”.
  1. Chapter 1: Strategic partners and strange bedfellows: relationship building in the relief supply chain. Larson Paul D. pp. 1-15.
  2. Chapter 2: Humanitarian partnerships, drivers, facilitators, and components: The case of noon-food item. Tomasini Rolando M. pp. 16-30.
  3. Chapter 3: Relief supply chain planning: Insights from Thailand. Banomyong Ruth, Sodapang Apichat. pp. 31-44.
  4. Chapter 4: Humanitarian aid logistics: The Wenchuan and Haiti earthwuakes compared. Beresford Anthony, Pettit Stephen. pp. 45-67.
  5. Chapter 5: The application of value chain analysis for the evaluation of alternative supply chain strategies for the provision of humanitarian aid to Africa. Taylor David H. pp. 68-89.
  6. Chapter 6: Designing post-disaster supply chains: Learning from housing reconstruction projects. Kovacs Gyongyi, Matopoulos Aristides, Hayes Odran. pp. 90-102.
  7. Chapter 7: Local sourcing in peacekeeping: A case study of Swedish military sourcing. Skoglund Per, Hertz Susanne. pp. 103-122.
  8. Chapter 8: Military involvement in humanitarian supply chains. Barber Elizabeth. pp. 123-146.
  9. Chapter 9: Challenges of civil military cooperation/coordination in humanitarian relief. Heaslip Graham. pp. 147-172.
  10. Chapter 10: Developing and maintaining trust in hastily formed relief networks. Tatham Peter, Kovacs Gyongyi. pp. 173-195.
  11. Chapter 11: A study of barriers to greening the relief supply chain. Sarkis Joseph, Spens Karen M., Kovacs Gyongyi. pp. 196- 207.
  12. Chapter 12: Disaster impact and country logistics performance. pp. 208- 224.
  • Christopher Martin, Tatham Peter. 2011. 1st Edition. “Humanitarian Logistics: Meeting the challenge of preparing for and responding to disasters”.
  1. Chapter 1: Risky business: what humanitarians can learn from business logisticians – and vice versa. Larson Paul D. pp. 15-32.
  2. Chapter 2: Impacts of funding systems on humanitarian operations. Wakolbinger Tina, Toyosaki Fuminori. pp. 33-46.
  3. Chapter 3: The importance of information technology in humanitarian supply chains: opportunities and challenges in the Helios project. Blansjaar Martijn, Van der Merwe Charl. pp. 47-64.
  4. Chapter 4: Humanitarian logistics metrics: where we are and how we might improve. Tatham Peter, Hughes Kate. pp. 65-84.
  5. Chapter 5: Humanitarian logistics and the cluster approach: global shifts and the US perspective. Altay Nezih, Labonte Melissa. pp. 85-102.
  6. Chapter 6: The 2004 Thailand tsunami reviewed: lessons learned. Petit Stephen, Beresford Anthony, Whiting Michael, Banomyong Ruth. pp. 103-120.
  7. Chapter 7: The journey to humanitarian supply network management: an African perspective. Buatsi Paul SN. pp. 121-140.
  8. Chapter 8: Humanitarian logistics in the United States: supply chain systems for responding to domestic disasters. Goentzel Jarrod, Spens Karen. pp. 141-164.
  9. Chapter 9: The supply network’s role as an enabler of development. Ellis Deborah. pp. 165-178.
  10. Chapter 10: Humanitarian logistics professionalism. Moore David M., Taylor David H. pp. 179-200.
  11. Chapter 11: Humanitarian logistics: a cultural perspective. Dowty Rachel A. pp. 201- 214.
  12. Chapter 12: The impossible interface? Combining humanitarian logistics and military supply chain capabilities. Seipel Jersey. pp. 215- 232.
  13. Chapter 13: Disaster agencies and military forces – not such strange bedfellows after all. Cross Tim. pp. 233-248.
  14. Chapter 14: So where next? Developments in humanitarian logistics. Kovacs Gyongyi. pp. 249-254.
  • Christopher Martin, Tatham Peter. 2014. 2nd Edition. “Humanitarian Logistics: Meeting the challenge of preparing for and responding to disasters”.
  1. Chapter 1: An improvement process for process improvement: quality and accountability in humanitarian logistics. Larson Paul D. pp. 19-40.
  2. Chapter 2: Impacts of funding systems on humanitarian operations. Wakolbinger Tina, Toyosaki Fuminori. pp. 41-56.
  3. Chapter 3: Information technology in humanitarian supply chain. Blansjaar Martijn, Stephens Fraser. pp p. 57-76.
  4. Chapter 4: Cracking the humanitarian logistic coordination challenge: some pointers from the International Search and Rescue Advisory Group and the Foreign Medical Teams. Tatham Peter, Spens Karen. pp. 77-96.
  5. Chapter 5: Humanitarian logistics and the cluster approach: global shifts and the US perspective. Altay Nezih, Labonte Melissa. pp. 97-114.
  6. Chapter 6: The increasing importance of services in humanitarian logistics. Heaslip Graham. pp. 114-128.
  7. Chapter 7: The 2004 Thailand tsunami and the April 2012 tsunami warning: were lessons learned. Petit Stephen, Beresford Anthony, Whiting Michael, Beresford Sylvie. pp. 129-150.
  8. Chapter 8: The journal to humanitarian supply network management: an African perspective. Buatsi Paul, Mbohwa Charles. pp. 151-174.
  9. Chapter 9: Emergency preparedness: experience of international humanitarian organizations in Southeast Asia. Lu Qing, Goh Mark, de Soouza Robert. pp. 175-188.
  10. Chapter 10: Humanitarian logistics professionalism. Moore David M., Taylor David H. pp. 189-214.
  11. Chapter 11: What next for humanitarian logistics? Fenton George, Goodhand Mike, Vince Rebecca. pp. 215- 234.
  12. Chapter 12: The impossible interface? Combining humanitarian logistics and military supply chain capabilities. Seipel Jersey, Heaslip Graham. pp. 235- 256.
  13. Chapter 13: Disaster agencies and military forces – not such strange bedfellows after all!. Cross Tim. pp. 257-274.
  14. Chapter 14: Where next? The future of humanitarian logistics. Kovacs Gyongyi. pp. 275-283.
  • Schulz Sabine Friederike. 2009. “Disaster Relief Logistics: Benefits of and impediments to cooperation between humanitarian organizations”, Kühne Foundation Book Series on Logistics 15.
  • Blecken Alexander. 2010. “Humanitarian Logistics in Asia Pacific: Modeling supply chain processes of humanitarian organizations”, Kühne Foundation Book Series on Logistics 18.
  • De Soouza Robert, Stumpf Jonas. 2012. “Humanitarian Logistics in Asia Pacific: Challenges, opportunities and perspectives”, Kühne Foundation Book Series on Logistics 19

Part 1: Overviews of humanitarian logistics in Asia Pacific.
1.    Humanitarian logistics in Asia – Adapting to new challenges
2.    Humanitarian logistics in Asia: Challenges and opportunities
3.    WFP footprint in Asia
4.    UNHCR footprint in Asia


Part 2: Humanitarian logistics from academic perspectives and their solutions.
5.    Towards a common humanitarian logistic picture
6.    Knowledge learning and relief logistics
7.    Experiential learning for humanitarian logistics
8.    Modeling competition for scarce medical supplies in emergency operations


Part 3: Humanitarian logistics at the ground: Challenges and practical solutions.
9.    Logistics and the cyclone Nargis experience
10.  Humanitarian logistics in the Pacific islands
11.  Maximizing supply efficiency through consortia: A story of Oxfam lead FRESH project
12.  Role of public buildings as logistics Centre in relief operation at Merapi’s 2010 eruption
13.  Business continuity & humanitarian logistics: An insight from Thailand


Part 4: Humanitarian logistics and the private sector.
14.  How information technology can contribute to humanitarian disaster response
15.  Fighting the power of disasters with the power of logistics

Further content

Contact

Christos Bitos

Tel: +49 40 328707-302
Fax: +49 40 328707-109
christos.bitos(at)the-klu.org