Center for Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chains (CSLS)

Center for Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chains (CSLS)

Making supply chains and logistics operations more sustainable through research and education. 

The Center for Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chains was founded in 2020 at Kühne Logistics University with the support of Kuehne+Nagel. The CSLS aims to foster the UN Sustainable Development Goals from a supply chain and logistics perspective. To achieve this, we conduct rigorous academic research of high industry relevance. We also deliver thought-leading education and outreach activities. 

While we emphasize the decarbonization of logistics, our activities span the entire supply chain and consider a wide range of sustainability aspects. The CSLS promotes the KLU as a leading university in sustainable logistics and supply chains and contributes to establishing Hamburg as an international knowledge hub for this topic.

Selected Publications

Abstract: As concern for the environment rises, companies must take more account of the external costs of logistics associated mainly with climate change, air pollution, noise, vibration and accidents. Green Logistics analyses the environmental consequences of logistics and how to deal with them. Written by a leading team of logistics academics, the book examines ways of reducing these externalities and achieving a more sustainable balance between economic, environmental and social objectives. It examines key areas in this important subject including: carbon auditing of supply chains; transferring freight to greener transport modes; reducing the environmental impact of warehousing; improving fuel efficiency in freight transport; reverse logistics for the management of waste. The new edition is completely updated throughout with new methodologies and case studies to illustrate the impact of green logistics in practice.

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Open reference in new window "Green Logistics: Improving the Environmental Sustainability of Logistics"

 

Abstract: Logistics accounts for around 9-10% of global CO2 emissions and will be one of the hardest economic sectors to decarbonize. This is partly because the demand for freight transport is expected to rise sharply over the next few decades, but also because it relies very heavily on fossil fuel. Decarbonizing Logistics outlines the nature and extent of the challenge we face in trying to achieve deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from logistical activities. It makes a detailed assessment of the available options, including restructuring supply chains, shifting freight to lower carbon transport modes and transforming energy use in the logistics sector. The options are examined from technological and managerial standpoints for all the main freight transport modes. Based on an up-to-date review of almost 600 publications and containing new analytical frameworks and research results, Decarbonizing Logistics is the first to provide a global, multi-disciplinary perspective on the subject. It is written by one of the foremost specialists in the field who has spent many years researching the links between logistics and climate change and been an adviser to governments, international organizations and companies on the topic.

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Open reference in new window "Decarbonizing logistics: Distributing goods in a low-carbon world"

DOI: doi:10.1108/IJOPM-03-2019-0181 

Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore how big-picture sustainability strategies are translated into tangible product development efforts. The authors assert that most sustainable products currently remain confined to niche markets and do not permeate the mainstream. The authors propose that there is a missing link between strategic sustainability goals and operational product development initiatives. The authors establish a path to bridging this gap. Design/methodology/approach The manuscript is based on a qualitative research design with a sample of 32 companies. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with product developers as well as secondary data analysis. Findings The authors delineate three empirically derived approaches firms from the sample pursue to develop sustainable products. The authors identify a phenomenon that the authors’ call the fallacy of trickle-down product sustainability. The authors find that only one of the three approaches – codification – is equipped to successfully turn strategic sustainability targets into authentic sustainable products. Practical implications This study provides an actionable guide to executives and product developers with respect to bridging the gap between often elusive sustainability aspirations and tangible product improvements via the process of rigorous codification. Originality/value This study provides a novel and unique perspective into strategy, sustainability and product development. The authors synthesize the extant literature on sustainable product development, juxtapose the emergent structure with primary interview data, and elaborate the resource-based view (RBV) to provide theoretical and practical implications. The authors establish scalability as the missing RBV capability of many attempts toward mass–market compatibility of more sustainable products.

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Open reference in new window "The fallacy of “trickle-down” product sustainability: Translating strategic sustainability targets into product development efforts"

Abstract: How is the case for ‘building back greener’ impacting on logistical activities, which collectively account for around 10-11% of global CO2 emissions?

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Open reference in new window "Decarbonising European logistics: a progress report."

Abstract: Recycling activities are complex and involve many actors. Recycling supply chains are under increasing pressure due to higher volumes of waste and rising requirements regarding the treatment and quality of the secondary raw materials. We aim to identify challenges and best practices in recycling supply chains. The analysis comprises the recycling supply chains of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), plastics packaging, construction and demolition, glass, and paper waste. 36 interviews with actors from different stages of the recycling process are analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results show that the main challenges are related to impurities in the waste streams resulting, among other reasons, from wrong disposal, treatment with unsuitable equipment, or inadequate product design. Furthermore, we highlight that a joint effort of the different actors in the supply chain is necessary to overcome the current challenges and improve the quantity and quality of secondary raw materials.

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Open reference in new window "Challenges and Best Practices in Recycling Supply Chains: A Qualitative Analysis of Five Major Waste Streams. Center for Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chains at Kühne Logistics University: Endbericht Forschungsprojekt"

Team

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Prof. Dr. Moritz Petersen

Assistant Professor of Sustainable Supply Chain Practice & Academic Director Center for Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chains

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Prof. Alan C. McKinnon, PhD

Professor of Logistics

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Moritz Jäger-Roschko

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Sarah Joseph

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University GmbH

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