Hapag-Lloyd Center
for Shipping and Global Logistics (CSGL)

A KLU Research Center founded with the support of Hapag-Lloyd. 

"The CSGL strengthens the position of KLU in Global Container Logistics, leveraging on the partnership with Hapag-Lloyd, promoting KLU as a leading university in this field and contributing to establish Hamburg as an international maritime knowledge hub."

Kühne Logistics University (KLU) thanks to the support of Hapag-Lloyd founded the Hapag-Lloyd Center for Shipping and Global Logistics (CSGL) in 2018. The purpose of the Center is to combine rigorous academic research with practical experiences and insights in the area of shipping and container transport, to increase the competiveness of the sector and contribute to the development of Hamburg as an international maritime knowledge hub.
The CSGL research team will pursue the advancement of shipping and maritime transportation topics in areas such as digitalisation, sustainability and the value creation of value. The Center is an integral part of the KLU and capitalises on the expertise and competences of KLU professors and researchers. Additional expertise is provided by the Center associated members.

The CSGL Team

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Prof. Michele Acciaro, PhD

Associate Professor of Maritime Logistics / Director Hapag-Lloyd Center for Shipping and Global Logistics (CSGL)

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

Tel: +49 40 328707-281
michele.acciaro@the-klu.org

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Christopher Dirzka

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

Tel: +49 40 328707-305
christopher.dirzka@the.klu.org

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Naouar El Khadiri

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

Tel: +49 40 328707-305
naouar.elkhadiri@the-klu.org

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Mohammad Ghorbani

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

Tel: +49 40 328707-305
mohammad.ghorbani@the-klu.org

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Vasileios Kosmas

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

Tel: +49 40 328707-302
vasileios.kosmas@the-klu.org

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Dr. Katharina Renken

Senior Researcher

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

Tel: +49 40 328707-210
katharina.renken@the-klu.org

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Michael Stein

External Researcher

Hapag-Lloyd Center for Shipping and Global Logistics (CSGL)

michael.stein@the-klu.org

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Duo Yang

German Chancellor Fellow of Alexander von Humboldt Foundation

Kühne Logistics University - LU

Tel: +49 40 328707-313
duo.yang@the-klu.org

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Associated Members

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Prof. Pierre Cariou, PhD

Senior Professor in Shipping and Port Economics

KEDGE Business School

pierre.cariou@kedgebs.com

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Prof. Dr. Jan Fransoo

Professor for Operations Management and Logistics & Dean of Research

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

jan.fransoo@the-klu.org

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Prof. Dr. Hanno Friedrich

Assistant Professor of Freight Transportation - Modelling and Policy

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

hanno.friedrich@the-klu.org

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Prof. Dr. André Ludwig

Associate Professor of Computer Science in Logistics and Spokesman of the KCA Digital Transformation

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

andre.ludwig@the-klu.org

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Prof. Alan C. McKinnon, PhD

Professor of Logistics

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

alan.mckinnon@the-klu.org

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Prof. Dr. Sandra Transchel

Associate Professor for Supply Chain and Operations Management

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

sandra.transchel@the-klu.org

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Prof. Dr. Gordon Wilmsmeier

Universidad de los Andes, School of Management, Colombia

Kühne Professorial Chair in Logistics

g.wilmsmeier@uniandes.edu.co

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Related selected publications

DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.02.098 

Abstract: Despite the rising popularity of the corporate sustainability discourse in recent years, its role in the maritime industry, and in ports in particular, has been limited. Through an online survey, this study assessed the current state of corporate sustainability in ports in Canada and the US. The study ascertained the perception of port executives towards sustainability, analyzed port sustainability strategies and practices, and identified the main factors (motivations/driving factors and key challenges/barriers) influencing future adoption and implementation of corporate sustainability in ports. Results show that the majority of ports perceive sustainability as important and have adopted a number of sustainability strategies and practices, such as sustainability awareness and training programs, sustainability reporting, and sustainability initiatives and standards (e.g., Green Marine and ISO 14001 certification). Results also show that sustainability strategies have resulted in improved stakeholder relations in ports mainly with government/policy makers, customers, local communities, and industry associations. Yet, findings indicate that although corporate sustainability is regarded as important in the majority of ports, it is not fully integrated in strategic decision-making processes and operations in most ports. This study also investigated influencing factors for adoption of corporate sustainability in ports. Motivations/driving factors identified are growth, return on investment, risk management, and corporate citizenship, while main key challenges/barriers include cost associated with sustainability actions, lack of sustainability competences within the organization, limited customer interest for more sustainability services, and difficulty in implementing sustainability practices. Findings reveal that although many of the identified influencing factors for adoption and implementation of corporate sustainability in ports are similar to those identified in other studies, some are more sector specific which has allowed this study to contribute to advancing knowledge of corporate sustainability in the context of ports with novel insights.

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Abstract: Effective adaptation to climate change impacts is rapidly becoming an important research topic. Hitherto, the perceptions and attitudes of stakeholders on climate adaptation actions are understudied, partly due to the emphasis on physical and engineering aspects during the adaptation planning process. Building on such considerations the paper explores the perceptions of port decision-makers on the effectiveness of climate adaptation actions. The findings suggest that while port decision-makers are aware of potential climate change impacts and feel that more adaptation actions should be undertaken, they are sceptical about their effectiveness and value. This is complemented by a regional analysis on the results, suggesting that more tailor-made adaptation measures suited to local circumstances should be developed. The study illustrates the complexity of climate adaptation planning and of involving port decision-makers under the current planning paradigm.

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DOI: 10.1080/03088839.2018.1466062 

Abstract: The maritime and port sector is widely considered conservative concerning the ability to introduce innovation in respect to other industries. This may be due to the lack of cooperative interactions among the several players involved. It does not mean that innovation does not occur in this industry. Along with some technical innovations, managerial, organizational, and cultural innovations also take place in the sector. The literature has considered the assessment and effects of the adoption of particular innovation, but still few studies underline the innovation path in a broad sense with a specific focus on terminal operators. The present article aims at filling this gap through a field analysis grouping together case studies developed in different world regions and examining the adoption path of innovation through a mix of three different techniques (i.e. the H- and I-indexes, a Systems of Innovation Analysis, and a Qualitative Comparative Analysis). Research outcomes underline how, even if no unique recipe for success can be found, specific factors (e.g. a ranking of innovation objectives, coordination among actors, and institutions) can influence the achievement of success. The analyses allow suggesting strategic and policy advice that may help link in a better way the innovation drivers with their actual effects.

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DOI: 10.1016/j.trd.2017.09.010 

Abstract: A fuel levy is one of the market-based measures (MBMs) currently under consideration at the International Maritime Organization. MBMs have been proposed to improve the energy efficiency of the shipping sector and reduce its emissions. This paper analyses the economic and environmental implications of two types of levy on shipping bunker fuels by means of an analytical model built on the cobweb theorem. A unit-tax per ton of fuel and an ad-valorem tax, enforced as a percentage of fuel prices, are examined. In both cases, a speed and fuel-consumption reduction equivalent to an improvement in the energy efficiency of the sector would be expected as a result of the regulation enforcement. The speed reduction in the unit-tax case depends on fuel prices and the tax amount, whereas in the ad-valorem case it relies upon the enforced tax percentage. Both schemes lead to industry profit decline, the extent of which depend on the structure of the levy and market conditions. Since there is concern that the costs resulting from the policy will be passed from shipping companies to their customers along the supply chain, the paper dwells on how the costs arising from the enforcement of the levy will be actually allocated between ship-owners and operators, and cargo-owners. In a market characterised by high freight rates and with no or limited excess capacity, a higher percentage of the total tax amount is transferred from ship-owners to shippers. In case of a recession the opposite happens.

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DOI: 10.1016/j.cstp.2017.03.006 

Abstract: Ports compete not only on the sea-side (e.g. through terminal investments, increase in terminal efficiency, maritime service connectivity) but also on the land-side (e.g. through logistics chain, advanced IT services, door-to-door connectivity). On this issue, several studies (e.g. Meersman et al., 2009; Tongzon, 2009) recently pointed out the increasing importance of the connectivity – at both quality and quantity level – between the port and its own hinterland in order to be competitive in the modern maritime service structure. The analysis concentrates on the study of the port hinterland contestability and on the definition of the catchment area focusing on a case study (i.e. the Adriatic ports aiming at attracting the Southern German freight flows) in order to better understand which elements affect the possibility to expand the current ports’ hinterland. The empirical research is based on public statistics (e.g. Eurostat, Amadeus database) and on data directly collected from the operators currently serving Southern German firms with the main commercial ports and with the potential port actors that may be interested in an enlargement of the port catchment area in the studied region (e.g. South European ports). Apart from the trade pattern analysis – based on the general statistics – and the logistics structure analysis – based on the information collected by transport and logistics operators –, a direct survey has been conducted on a sample of manufacturing companies located in Southern Germany and Western Austria in order to understand what actions should be taken in order to promote the use of Adriatic ports and then reshape the boundaries of the catchment areas of these ports. Statistical tools and a bottom-up approach have been developed in order to evaluate the results. Main findings are then related to potential strategies that may fill in the competitive gap between Northern and Southern European ports when they compete to serve the same hinterland. The original contribution of the research is an insight on the relative importance of the infrastructure endowment, the generalized transport cost and also of some non-monetary conditions – as cultural and behavioural aspects – that have an influence in determining the effective boundaries of ports’ hinterland.

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