Hapag-Lloyd Center
for Shipping and Global Logistics (CSGL)

Hapag-Lloyd Center
for Shipping and Global Logistics (CSGL)

A KLU Research Center founded with the support of Hapag-Lloyd. 

"The CSGL strengthens the position of KLU in Global Container Logistics, leveraging on the partnership with Hapag-Lloyd, promoting KLU as a leading university in this field and contributing to establish Hamburg as an international maritime knowledge hub."

Kühne Logistics University (KLU) thanks to the support of Hapag-Lloyd founded the Hapag-Lloyd Center for Shipping and Global Logistics (CSGL) in 2018. The purpose of the Center is to combine rigorous academic research with practical experiences and insights in the area of shipping and container transport, to increase the competiveness of the sector and contribute to the development of Hamburg as an international maritime knowledge hub.
The CSGL research team will pursue the advancement of shipping and maritime transportation topics in areas such as digitalisation, sustainability and the value creation of value. The Center is an integral part of the KLU and capitalises on the expertise and competences of KLU professors and researchers. Additional expertise is provided by the Center associated members.

The CSGL Team

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Prof. Michele Acciaro, PhD

Associate Professor of Maritime Logistics / Director Hapag-Lloyd Center for Shipping and Global Logistics (CSGL)

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Christopher Dirzka

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Mohammad Ghorbani

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Dr. Vasileios Kosmas, PhD

PostDoc

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Dr. Yasmine Rashed, PhD

Senior Researcher

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Dr. Katharina Renken

Senior Researcher

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Michael Stein

External Researcher

Hapag-Lloyd Center for Shipping and Global Logistics (CSGL)

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Associated Members

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Prof. Pierre Cariou, PhD

Senior Professor in Shipping and Port Economics

KEDGE Business School

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Prof. Dr. Jan Fransoo

Professor for Operations Management and Logistics & Dean of Research

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Prof. Dr. Hanno Friedrich

Associate Professor of Freight Transportation - Modelling and Policy

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Prof. Dr. André Ludwig

Associate Professor of Computer Science in Logistics and Spokesman of the KCA Digital Transformation

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Prof. Alan C. McKinnon, PhD

Professor of Logistics

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Prof. Dr. Sandra Transchel

Professor for Supply Chain and Operations Management

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

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Prof. Dr. Gordon Wilmsmeier

Universidad de los Andes, School of Management, Colombia

Kühne Professorial Chair in Logistics

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Selected Publications

DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2014.04.013 

Abstract: Ports are characterised by the geographical concentration of high–energy demand and supply activities, because of their proximity to power generation facilities and metropolitan regions, and their functions as central hubs in the transport of raw materials. In the last decades the need to better understand and monitor energy-related activities taking place near or within the port has become more apparent as a consequence of the growing relevance of energy trades, public environmental awareness and a bigger industry focus on energy efficiency. The uptake in the port sector of innovative technologies, such as onshore power supply, or alternative fuels, such as LNG, and the increasing development of renewable energy installations in port areas, also calls for more attention to energy matters within port management. So far, however, few port authorities have actively pursued energy management strategies. The necessity for port authorities to actively manage their energy flows stems from their efforts to plan, coordinate and facilitate the development of economic activities within the port, and as a consequence of the heavier weight that sustainability is given within the port management strategies. Through the analysis of the experiences of two European ports, Hamburg and Genoa, that have already attempted to coordinate and rationalise their energy needs, this paper will argue that for the ports of the future active energy management can offer substantial efficiency gains, can contribute to the development of new alternative revenue sources and in the end, improve the competitive position of the port.

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DOI: 10.1007/s10584-013-0843-z 

Abstract: With 80 % of world trade carried by sea, seaports provide crucial linkages in global supply-chains and are essential for the ability of all countries to access global markets. Seaports are likely to be affected directly and indirectly by climatic changes, with broader implications for international trade and development. Due to their coastal location, seaports are particularly vulnerable to extreme weather events associated with increasing sea levels and tropical storm activity, as illustrated by hurricane “Sandy”. In view of their strategic role as part of the globalized trading system, adapting ports in different parts of the world to the impacts of climate change is of considerable importance. Reflecting the views of a diverse group of stakeholders with expertise in climate science, engineering, economics, policy, and port management, this essay highlights the climate change challenge for ports and suggests a way forward through the adoption of some initial measures. These include both “soft” and “hard” adaptations that may be spearheaded by individual port entities, but will require collaboration and support from a broad range of public and private sector stakeholders and from society at large. In particular, the essay highlights a need to shift to more holistic planning, investment and operation.

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