Center for Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chains (CSLS)

Center for Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chains (CSLS)

Making supply chains and logistics operations more sustainable through research and education. 

The CSLS is a research center dedicated to accelerating the transition towards more sustainable supply chains and logistics. The CSLS team draws on KLU's strong track record of logistics-focused research around environmental sustainability and collaborates with influential stakeholders (e.g., companies, policymakers, and NGOs) to establish Hamburg as an international knowledge hub for this topic.

The activities of the CSLS focus on three broader topics relevant for sustainable logistics and supply chains: (1) decarbonizing logistics, (2) closed-loop supply chains and the circular economy, and (3) corporate sustainability. All research and outreach activities and the CSLS activities in the context of skill-building address at least one of these topics.

Selected Publications

DOI: 10.5465/AMBPP.2021.10554abstract 

Abstract: Interest in platforms has rapidly proliferated during the last decade. Yet, research has thus far exclusively focused on purely digital platforms and has failed to offer insights into so-called cyber-physical platform that integrate the digital space with the physical world. In this paper, we introduce the notion of cyber-physical platforms and contribute to research on platforms by asking what cyber-physical platforms are. Additionally, through an in-depth case study of Yourban, the Enel X cyber-physical platform for municipalities and public administrations to integrate and manage smart city services, we explore how their essential features influence the technological architecture, competitive dynamics and ecosystem management of cyber-physical platforms. Our findings show how the physical components pose a significant entry barrier, protecting incumbents while limiting the growth potential of cyber-physical platforms. We also explain why density rather than network effects appear to be more important for cyber-physical platforms than for digital platforms and why platform openness is a necessity rather than a choice for platform providers. Together, our article provides contributions to research on platforms and outlines possible directions for future research.

Export record:CitaviEndnoteRISISIBibTeXWordXML

Open reference in new window "Beyond digital platforms: Exploring the design and competitive dynamics of cyber-physical platforms"

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1086026619850180 

Abstract: Scholarly and managerial interest in corporate sustainability has increased significantly in the past two decades. However, the field is increasingly criticized for failing to effectively contribute to sustainable development and for its limited impact on managerial practice. We argue that this criticism arises due to a fundamental ambiguity around the nature of corporate sustainability. To address the lack of concept clarity, we conduct a systematic literature review and identify 33 definitions of corporate sustainability. Adopting the Aristotelian perspective on definitions, one that promotes reducing concepts to their essential attributes, we discern four components of corporate sustainability. These components offer a conceptual space of inquiry that, while being parsimonious, offers nuanced understanding of the dimensions along which definitions of corporate sustainability differ. We discuss implications for research and practice and outline several recommendations for how advancements in construct clarity may lead to a better scholarly understanding of corporate sustainability.

Export record:CitaviEndnoteRISISIBibTeXWordXML

Open reference in new window "On the Nature of Corporate Sustainability"

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2020.110710 

Abstract: Decentralized renewable energy systems (DRES) integrate renewable energy sources with energy-efficient building technologies and represent an important instrument for a sustainable built environment. Given their technological complexity, DRES also include comprehensive monitoring systems that offer important opportunities to optimize energy flows and increase energy efficiency. For these reasons, research has developed a range of automated optimization models and algorithms, such as association rule mining or fault detection diagnosis. To date, however, it remains unclear under what conditions these advanced and automated technologies may best be integrated to optimize DRES. This paper provides a complementary industry perspective, drawing on an in-depth case study of the optimization activities within one of the most advanced DRES in Switzerland. Over the course of five years, some of the optimization measures helped reduce energy consumption by 55–60%. Yet, the optimization potential of other measures remained unclear. The case study shows that, while technical aspects have given rise to optimization potential, organizational aspects have prevented, or at least delayed, the application of scientific algorithms, and have thus obstructed the realization of this optimization potential. These findings call for researchers to better integrate the technical and operational aspects into the optimization of energy systems and also offer important recommendations for policymakers, investors, and energy planners.

Export record:CitaviEndnoteRISISIBibTeXWordXML

Open reference in new window "Embedding energy optimization in organizations: A case study of a Swiss decentralized renewable energy system"

DOI: 10.1109/ACCESS.2020.2974622 

Abstract: Blockchain is expected to have a transformational effect on supply chain and logistics due to its promise to improve the information flow between the supply chain partners. However, despite their high hopes, incumbent companies from supply chain and logistics are still struggling to deliver on this promise. In this explorative, qualitative interview study, we identify how incumbent companies try to make use of Blockchain in supply chain and logistics and we also analyze the barriers hampering them. The analysis of twenty-four semi-structured expert interviews and extensive secondary data collates a comprehensive picture of incumbent companies' activities around Blockchain adoption. We find that companies use Blockchain to drive digital transformation, constitute new business models and unify the industry through consortia. The main barriers to such solutions are a lack of technological usability and long-term uncertainties. The results of our study provide evidence for theoretical constructs and guide managerial practice.

Export record:CitaviEndnoteRISISIBibTeXWordXML

Open reference in new window "Translating High Hopes Into Tangible Benefits: How Incumbents in Supply Chain and Logistics Approach Blockchain"

DOI: https://doi.org/10.30844/I40M_22-1_41-44 

Abstract: Der IPCC-Report aus dem August 2021 ist die jüngste einer Reihe von deutlichen Warnungen vor den Folgen des voranschreitenden Klimawandels. Alle Wirtschaftsbereiche stehen mehr denn je in der Verantwortung, ihre Treibhausgasemissionen schnell und umfassend zu senken. Die Logistik macht etwa 10 % des globalen CO2-Ausstoßes aus. Der größte Anteil entfällt auf den Straßengüterverkehr. Aufgrund hoher Wachstumsraten, der anhaltenden Abhängigkeit von fossilen Brennstoffen und der hohen Fragmentierung des Markts ist die Senkung der CO2-Emissionen bzw. die sogenannte Dekarbonisierung des Straßengüterverkehrs besonders herausfordernd. Auf Basis der Ergebnisse einer großen Umfrage wird in diesem Beitrag herausgearbeitet, wie kleine Transportdienstleister und ihre Auftraggeber einen Beitrag zur Erreichung globaler Klimaziele leisten können. Im ersten Schritt kann eine genauere Messung der CO2-Emissionen dabei helfen, die Vorteilhaftigkeit lange bekannter aber nicht immer genutzter Dekarbonisierungsmaßnahmen klar herauszustellen. Auftraggeber können ihre Transportdienstleister dann zusätzlich mit passenden Anreizsystemen motivieren und unterstützen.

Export record:CitaviEndnoteRISISIBibTeXWordXML

Open reference in new window "Maßnahmen und Anreize zur Senkung von CO2-Emissionen - Wie kleine Transportdienstleister und ihre Auftraggeber einem klimafreundlichen Straßengüterverkehr näherkommen können"

Events

No content available yet.

Team

Profile image

Prof. Dr. Johannes Meuer

Associate Professor for Sustainability Strategy and Operations, Co-Director Center for Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chains

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Prof. Dr. Moritz Petersen

Assistant Professor of Sustainable Supply Chain Practice & Academic Director Center for Sustainable Logistics and Supply Chains

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Prof. Alan C. McKinnon, PhD

Professor of Logistics

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Prof. Dr. Andreas Kilian Gernert

Assistant Professor for Sustainable Operations

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Dr. Sandra Luttermann

Senior Scientist

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

Profile image

Moritz Jäger-Roschko

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Duncan Mc Geough

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Ramón van Almsick

Research Associate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Michael Ntiriakwa

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Andrés Felipe Rey

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Thomas Twenhöven

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Dounia Chlyeh

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics Univeristy - KLU

View profile

Affiliate Members

Profile image

Robin Kabelitz-Bock

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Prof. Dr. Gordon Wilmsmeier

Associate Professor for Shipping and Global Logistics, Director of the Hapag-Lloyd Center for Shipping and Global Logistics (CSGL)

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Prof. Dr. Shushu Liao

Assistant Professor of Finance

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Prof. Marcos Ritel, PhD

Assistant Professor for International Trade

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile

Profile image

Lara Pomaska

PhD Candidate

Kühne Logistics University - KLU

View profile